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Kentwood, MI 49508
(616) 724-1780
 


1235 W. State ST
Hastings, MI 49058
(269) 948-8029

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Posts for: November, 2013

TakingCareofyourTeethDuringPregnancyHelpsBothyouandyourBaby

During pregnancy, a mother has many health concerns for both her baby and herself. Though it may not seem as important, dental health and development should be on that list of concerns, for both you and your baby. In fact, your baby's tooth development is already well underway just a few weeks after conception. Pregnancy can also present challenges to your own dental health that definitely deserves your attention and care.

Taking care of your own dietary needs and dental health is also the best thing you can do for your baby. The baby growing within you needs calcium, phosphorus, vitamins and other minerals for the healthy development of teeth and bones. That can only come from you eating a balanced diet rich in these nutrients.

During pregnancy, you are also more susceptible to gingivitis (inflammation of the gums) or other gum diseases because of the normal increase in the level of the hormone progesterone. In fact, some studies seem to indicate that severe gum disease might even raise the risk for premature birth and a low birth weight. It's important then to practice good dental hygiene during your pregnancy: brushing your teeth at least twice a day with an American Dental Association (ADA) approved fluoridated toothpaste, flossing and using an ADA approved mouth rinse that deters the buildup of plaque and the occurrence of gingivitis. Our office is also happy to provide you instruction on proper brushing and flossing technique to help you gain the most benefit from your daily hygiene.

By paying close attention to your own dental health and diet, you are actually doing the very best you can to provide your baby a solid foundation for a lifetime of good oral health.

If you would like more information on protecting your and your baby's oral health, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Expectant Mothers: Dental facts you need to know.”


By Applewood Dental
November 18, 2013
Category: Oral Health
PreventingToothDecayinChildren

If you think cavities are an inevitable part of childhood, think again; tooth decay, which is actually an infectious disease caused by bacteria, is completely preventable. This is a good thing, because tooth decay can be painful and interfere with a child's ability to eat, speak, and focus in school. Parents have a big role to play in helping their children's teeth stay healthy. Here are some things you can do:

Establish an oral hygiene routine. Good oral hygiene practices should start as soon as the first tooth appears. An infant's teeth should be wiped with a clean, damp washcloth each day. Starting at age 2, a brushing routine should be established using a soft-bristled, child-sized brush and just a smear of fluoride toothpaste. Children need help brushing until around age 6, when they have the dexterity to take over the job themselves — and learn to floss.

Limit sugary drinks and snacks. Sugar is the favorite food of decay-causing oral bacteria. In the process of breaking down that sugar, the bacteria produce tooth-eroding acid. Too much exposure to this acid will leave a small hole, or cavity, in the tooth and create an entry point for the bacteria to reach deeper inside the tooth. Beverages that are sugary AND acidic, such as sodas and sports drinks, are particularly harmful.

Make sure your child sees the dentist regularly. Routine exams and cleanings are a must for good oral health. Even if your child is doing a good job maintaining an oral hygiene routine, there are places where bacterial plaque can build up beyond the reach of a toothbrush and floss. These areas require professional attention. We can also give your child an in-office fluoride treatment to strengthen enamel and reverse very early decay. In some cases, we will recommend dental sealants to smooth out the little grooves in a child's back teeth. This is a quick and easy in-office procedure that will keep out food debris and bacteria for years. And, of course, we can monitor your child's dental development.

If you have any questions about tooth decay or the development of your child's teeth, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more by reading the Dear Doctor magazine articles “Dentistry & Oral Health for Children” and “How to Help Your Child Develop the Best Habits for Oral Health.”


WithProperCareVeneersareaLong-TermOptionforStainedTeeth

Your otherwise beautiful smile has one noticeable flaw — one or more of your teeth are deeply discolored or stained. More than likely this staining is deep within the teeth, what we refer to as intrinsic staining. There are a number of reasons this can occur — from fillings or use of antibiotics, for example — and our first approach should be to attempt a whitening technique.

However, if that doesn't produce the desired result, porcelain laminate veneers are another option you might consider. Veneers are made of dental porcelain, a bio-compatible material that can be shaped and colored to closely match neighboring teeth. After a minimal amount of tooth reduction (removal of some of the enamel from the tooth surface) to prepare for the laminate, the veneers are then permanently bonded to the tooth surface and cover the discolored natural tooth. Besides changing the appearance of discolored or stained teeth, veneers can also be used to correct other imperfections such as chipped or misshapen teeth.

Patients, however, have a common question: how long will the veneers last? With proper care, veneers can last anywhere from seven years to more than twenty years. It's possible, though, to damage them — for example, you can break them if you bite down on something that goes beyond the porcelain's tolerance range, such as cracking nut shells with your teeth (not a good idea even for natural teeth!). You should also keep in mind that veneers are composed of inert, non-living material and are attached and surrounded by living gum tissue that can change over time. This process may eventually alter your appearance to the point that the veneer may need to be removed and reapplied to improve the look of your smile.

If a veneer is damaged, all is not necessarily lost. It may be possible to re-bond a loosened veneer or repair a chipped area. The worst case is replacement of the veneer altogether. Chances are, though, this will only happen after the veneer has already served you — and your smile — for many years.

If you would like more information on porcelain laminate veneers, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Porcelain Veneers.”


By Applewood Dental
November 07, 2013
Category: Oral Health
Tags: oral health   gluten  
YourBodysIntolerancetoGlutencanCauseDentalProblems

If you have noticed white spots or enamel pitting on your teeth, something in your diet may be the cause. If accompanied by other general symptoms, these dental problems may stem from a possible intolerance to gluten.

Gluten is a protein found in grains like wheat, barley or oats. Some people (an estimated one in 130 Americans) have a condition called Celiac Disease (CD) in which their immune system mistakenly treats gluten as a threat and initiates an attack of antibodies (individual proteins made by the immune system to target and kill specific foreign substances) against it. Tiny hair-like structures in the small intestine called cilia that aid in nutrient absorption may be destroyed in the process. As a result, the body can't properly absorb nutrients.

CD can be difficult to diagnose because its symptoms resemble other conditions like Irritable Bowel Syndrome. Typically, though, CD causes digestive issues like diarrhea, bloating and stomach aches, as well as fatigue, growth abnormalities and vitamin deficiencies. In the mouth, the most common symptoms are enamel defects like spotting and pitting. Patients may also lose a portion of their enamel in the grooves of the central incisors where the enamel may appear chalky or opaque rather than shiny, evidence of a condition called decalcification. CD may also cause canker sores.

Determining if you have CD is a two-step process. You must first undergo a blood test to see if antibodies are present for gluten. If the test returns positive confirming you have CD, the next step is a biopsy in which a small amount of intestinal tissue is removed and analyzed. This measures the degree of damage to the stomach lining, which will indicate whether or not you should remove foods containing gluten from your diet.

While research is ongoing to develop counteracting medications, removing gluten from your diet remains the most effective treatment for CD. Enamel defects caused by CD can also be treated with fluoride toothpastes and other aids to foster re-mineralization (restoring calcium and other mineral content to the enamel), and with cosmetic techniques to reduce any discoloration effect. CD patients should continue with normal oral hygiene efforts, with one exception: hygiene products (including polishing pastes and fluoride gels used in professional cleanings) should be gluten-free.

If you would like more information on how gluten may affect your oral health, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Gluten & Dental Problems.”




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