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Kentwood, MI 49508
(616) 724-1780
 


1235 W. State ST
Hastings, MI 49058
(269) 948-8029

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Posts for: August, 2013

By Applewood Dental
August 29, 2013
Category: Oral Health
TheEffectsofMissingTeeth

If you are one of the millions of Americans with missing teeth, then you're probably aware of some of the obvious side effects. You may feel self-conscious during conversations or simply avoid smiling altogether to conceal your dental issue. It is not uncommon for missing teeth to affect your confidence, but did you know that there are other problems that result from tooth loss?

For starters, if you have lost enough teeth, eating may become more difficult, in particular healthy foods, such as fruits and vegetables. This is one of the main reasons that inadequate dental care frequently results in nutritional deficiency.

Another very serious issue that results from missing teeth is bone loss. We sometimes refer to this as a “hidden consequence,” because you may not actually see or feel this issue right away. Did you know that bone is actually living tissue that needs constant stimulation to maintain its form and density? Thus, when a tooth is lost, the bone in the jaw that surrounded and supported that tooth melts away. There is a 25% decrease in width of bone during the first year after tooth loss and an overall 4 millimeters decrease in height over the next few years. The longer you have missing teeth, the greater the loss of bone.

As bone loss continues, it can actually affect the structure of your face. If you lose your teeth early in adulthood, by age 45 you might start to notice sunken cheeks. By age 60, your cheeks and lips will lose their support, resulting in a collapsed and aged look. If your teeth are not replaced, this process will continue, and you will be in danger of losing much of the structural support of your lips and cheeks.

Luckily, we can use dental implants to not only restore your smile, but also to halt this bone loss. Implants look, feel and function like your natural teeth and are made of titanium, which has the unique ability to fuse with your living bone. Among the many benefits of implants, they continue to provide stimulation to your bone, preventing further bone loss.

With a success rate of more than 95%, implants are the best long-term solution for tooth replacement.

If you would like more information about implants and bone loss, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “The Hidden Consequences of Losing Teeth.”


By Applewood Dental
August 22, 2013
Category: Oral Health
TreatmentOptionsForStainedTeeth

Do your teeth stain easily? Are you worried that your new white fillings won't remain white for very long? Staining generally falls into one of two categories — extrinsic (external) staining, which affects the outside of the teeth, and intrinsic (internal) staining, which is discoloration of the tooth structure itself. The good news is that both can be treated and, once we determine the exact cause, there are a number of options to remedy it. You can have whiter teeth in almost no time!

External staining is generally caused by beverages or foods like red wine, tea, coffee and some spices, or even substances like tobacco. Stain that is brown, black or gray can become even worse in the presence of dental bacterial plaque and when the mouth is dry. On the other hand, internal tooth staining can make the teeth appear more yellow as a natural result of aging, or after root canal treatment when tooth structure can become more brittle and dry.

Treatment for external (extrinsic) staining includes:

  • Lifestyle modification: You can help put a stop to your staining problem by reducing or eliminating the habits that cause it, such as smoking and drinking red wine.
  • Practicing efficient oral hygiene: Preventing extrinsic staining can be as simple as brushing twice a day with toothpaste that contains tooth-whitening agents or other solutions to reduce the appearance of stains. Don't be embarrassed to ask our office about brushing and flossing because most people do it wrong until they're properly instructed.
  • Professional Cleaning: We can remove some extrinsic staining with ultrasonic cleaning followed by polishing with an abrasive prophylactic paste.

Other treatment options to reverse either intrinsic or extrinsic staining include:

  • Whitening by bleaching: Bleaching for extrinsic stains can be performed either in our office or at your home using a whitening kit. Bleaching for internal (intrinsic) stains can only be conducted in our dental office because it typically involves bleaching the tooth or teeth from the inside.
  • Fillings and restorations: For teeth that have been stained due to decay, or for fillings that are old and discolored we can remove the decay and restore the teeth, which will restore them to their natural brighter color.

If you are ready to say goodbye to your stained teeth, call our office today to make an appointment. For more information about treating stained teeth, read the Dear Doctor magazine article “Tooth Staining: Getting To The Cause Of Tooth Discoloration Is The First Step Toward Successful Treatment.”


By Applewood Dental
August 14, 2013
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: dental implants  
MaintainingyourDentalImplants

Once you receive your dental implants, you can have peace-of-mind in knowing that you have chosen a successful tooth replacement option, with long-term success rates of well over 95%. Your implant will look, feel and function just like the natural teeth that it has replaced.

However, despite the natural appearance, when you visit us for a regular cleaning, you may notice that we are using special instruments to clean around the implant. Cleaning around implants differs from the maintenance of your natural teeth for two reasons:

  1. Your implants attach to the surrounding bone and gums in a very different way from your natural teeth.
  2. The materials that comprise your implants are very different than those that make up your natural teeth.

Cleaning implants is just as important as cleaning natural teeth, because both depend on healthy surrounding tissues for support. Just as bacterial biofilm (plaque) collects on your natural teeth, it can also collect on your implant. That is why it is very important to brush and floss thoroughly on a daily basis at home. Without daily biofilm removal, the gums surrounding your implant can become infected, leading to bone loss and eventually loss of the implant.

Your regular dental cleanings will also play an important role in keeping dental implants infection-free, and we will select the right instruments for a professional cleaning. We will ensure that these instruments will not damage the crown, abutment, or the implant itself. If implants are scratched, they can attract and harbor bacteria. That's why the instruments we use, called scalers and curettes, are most often made of plastics and resins. Natural teeth don't scratch in the same way, and therefore metal instruments need to be used to clean them.

A number of power instruments have nylon or plastic sheaths or tips to minimize implant damage. They clean by using high-frequency vibration, which may be necessary if large quantities of debris have accumulated on your implant. We use these on a low power setting with a lot of water irrigation, and sometimes antibacterial solutions, to clean and flush material.

When it comes to keeping your implants infection-free, keep in mind that the most successful formula will be consistent oral hygiene at home mixed with regular dental cleanings.

If you would like more information about maintaining your dental implants, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Dental Implant Maintenance.”


By Applewood Dental
August 06, 2013
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: crown  
FiveFactsAboutCrowns

A crown is a common type of dental restoration that has been available, in different forms, for a long while. When properly done, it may last for decades — and if desired, it can be made to match the shade of the natural teeth so well that it's nearly impossible to tell them apart. Some recent technological innovations may offer patients who need this treatment even more choices. To begin learning about dental crowns, let's start with five facts everyone should know.

Crowns are a type of restoration that can solve many dental problems.

There are many factors that may cause the structure of a tooth to become compromised. It can be weakened by grinding or chipping, gradually removed by repeated dental fillings, or suddenly broken by trauma. Sometimes, a more conservative treatment (like inlays or veneers) may be enough to take care of the problem. When it isn't, the missing tooth structure can be replaced by a crown.

Crowns replicate the form and function of natural teeth.

Because they must fit into your mouth perfectly and match your bite exactly, each crown is an individually-crafted item, made just for you. That means the form of a crown must look just like the tooth it replaces — before it was damaged. And, especially if it's for a front tooth, a crown is often carefully designed to match the particular shade of your teeth. If you are unhappy about the color of your other front teeth, tooth whitening should be done first before your new crown is created to get the best results possible.

Crowns can be made of different materials.

For over a hundred years, crowns have been made of gold. While this extremely long-lasting material remains popular, its use has been declining recently due to aesthetic factors. Two tooth-colored alternatives are all-porcelain and porcelain-fused-to-metal crowns. The exact shade and luster of these substances can be made to closely simulate the natural teeth. Each has advantages and disadvantages in particular situations but we will be happy to make recommendations as to what is in your best interests.

New technologies are changing the way crowns are prepared.

Advances in the field of materials science have led to crowns being fabricated from more durable high-tech substances, like ceramics made of zirconium dioxide. And the availability of small-scale computer-aided design and manufacturing technologies means that in some situations, it's possible for a crown to be fabricated right in the dental office, in minutes. Undoubtedly, these technologies will continue to improve in the future.

Delivering a quality crown is a blend of science and art.

No matter how high-tech the process becomes, producing a fully functional, long lasting and natural-looking crown remains a blend of aesthetics and science, seasoned with a healthy dose of clinical experience. It's also a team effort involving a skillful dentist, a talented dental laboratory technician and a knowledgeable patient — you.

If you would like more information about crowns, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine articles “Porcelain Crowns & Veneers,” “Gold or Porcelain Crowns,” and “Creating In-Office Dental Restorations With Computers.”




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(269) 948-8029