All our professionals maintain the highest levels of accreditation and pursue ongoing education to stay abreast of the latest trends in dentistry.

954 52nd Street SE
Kentwood, MI 49508
(616) 724-1780
 


1235 W. State ST
Hastings, MI 49058
(269) 948-8029

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Posts for: February, 2013

By Applewood Dental
February 26, 2013
Category: Dental Procedures
SedationDentistryFAQs

For some people, going to the dentist is just like any other routine healthcare visit that they manage without any qualms. For others, the experience can cause some trepidation or even anxiety. In fact, some people even contemplate canceling appointments and neglecting their oral healthcare. If the latter better describes how you or someone you know feels about going to the dentist — even for a routine exam and cleaning — then we have great news for you! We offer our patients oral sedation (sedation dentistry) that allows you to relax both your mind and body so that you can focus on feeling peaceful and at ease rather than anxious.

What is oral sedation?

Often referred to as “comfortable” or “relaxation” dentistry, sedation dentistry offers an approach to dentistry that includes gentle management of your anxiety by using an anti-anxiety prescription medication that simply dissolves away your anxiety. The medications are administered by mouth (orally) to help transition you from feeling nervous to a more comfortable state of being.

Is it easy to take?

Another reason oral sedation is so popular is because it does not require an injection (shot), so, if you are afraid of needles, you simply do not need to worry. Typically, a pill is first placed under your tongue (sub-lingually) where it dissolves and penetrates the skin going straight into your system and then the rest is simply swallowed. This method and the quick-acting sedation medication make relaxation both effective and safe.

Is it safe?

Pharmacists and health professionals measure medications' effectiveness by measuring their “therapeutic index.” The larger the number is on this scale, the safer the drug. The oral sedation medications we use have the highest numbers possible on this scale and thus they are the least likely to cause any adverse (negative) reactions.

Want to learn more?

Contact us today to discuss your questions or to schedule an appointment. You can also learn more by reading the article “Oral Sedation Dentistry.”


By Applewood Dental
February 15, 2013
Category: Oral Health
Tags: tooth wear   grinding  
UnconsciousHabitsCanWearDownTeeth

If your teeth have a worn appearance, it's possible you have a habit you're not even aware of: clenching or grinding your teeth. Also called “bruxism,” this destructive action causes your top and bottom teeth to come together or scrape past each other with a force that's many times what is normal for biting and chewing.

So what's normal? This can be expressed in terms of pounds. An adult usually exerts a force of 13-23 pounds to bite or chew food. But we have the potential to generate as much as 230 pounds of force, or 10 times what's normal. A “parafunctional” force of this magnitude applied repeatedly is bound to stress your teeth and other areas of your oral system. Besides wearing away the enamel of your teeth — and maybe even some of the softer dentin layer underneath — you may experience muscle spasms or pain in your jaw joints. Serious cases of wear can lead to “bite collapse” in which your face actually changes shape as your cheeks and lips lose support. This can make you look prematurely aged.

What can be done? To prevent further wear, we can fabricate for you a thin, plastic mouthguard that will protect your teeth at night or during times of intense stress. We can also recommend ways to temporarily relieve the discomfort that your grinding/clenching habits can cause. Heat and/or anti-inflammatory medication, for example, can be helpful.

If your tooth wear is minor (raggedness along the biting edge of a tooth or teeth) you may not need any restorative work. However, if tooth wear has already caused changes to your teeth and bite that you find aesthetically or functionally unacceptable, we can restore lost tooth structure in a variety of ways. Veneers and crowns are two examples.

If you have any questions about tooth wear or grinding habits, please contact us today to schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “How And Why Teeth Wear.”


ldquoPreplessrdquoPorcelainVeneersAreTheyRightForYou

Designing a better smile sometimes requires a change in the size, shape, or color of your teeth. Porcelain laminate veneers (thin layers of dental ceramic material) enhance your appearance by replacing the natural enamel on the outside of your teeth. A veneer is physically bonded to the surface of a tooth, in essence, becoming part of it.

Traditionally, a small amount of the natural tooth enamel is drilled away to allow room for the veneer. But today, in some circumstances, it is possible to use an approach where enamel reduction or preparation is not necessary because the veneers can be bonded directly onto the tooth's natural surface. These are called “Prepless” or “No-prep” veneers, and are used to create aesthetically pleasing and natural looking restorations. An advantage of the prepless procedure is that the process is reversible so that you can give your new smile a “test drive.”

You may be a good subject for Prepless veneers if:

  • Your smile is narrow because the teeth in the sides of your smile are positioned inward and do not show from a frontal view.
  • There is spacing between your teeth, and the teeth appear too small.
  • You have a fairly common genetic condition in which one or both of the teeth directly next to the two upper front teeth are very small and peg-shaped.
  • There is an imbalance between the size of your lips and teeth (large lips and small teeth), which are not in proportion to show off your best smile.

Prepless veneers are probably not for you if:

  • Your teeth are not aligned properly in your bite.
  • Your teeth are very crowded, resulting in poor facial profile.
  • Your teeth are already relatively large or positioned forward.

In these cases you may need to have some form of orthodontic treatment to move your teeth into better position. Sometimes veneers can be used to create an illusion of proper tooth alignment, but some amount of tooth reduction may be required.

We can assess whether prepless veneers are right for you. There is no substitute for an expert dentist's talent and expertise with the various cosmetic techniques available today. These skills combined with a thorough diagnostic evaluation, and a clear understanding of your goals, are the keys to providing you with a successful and beautiful smile.

Contact us today to schedule an appointment or to discuss your questions about cosmetic dentistry. You can also learn more about prepless veneers by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Porcelain Veneers Without the Drill.”


By Applewood Dental
February 03, 2013
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: oral health   root canal  
RootCanalPainmdashDoYouKnowTheSymptoms

Nearly everyone has either said or heard the expression, “I'd rather have a root canal...” when comparing worst-case scenarios. However, this comparison is a common myth for a treatment that is typically successful with little to no pain. In fact, the pain associated with a root canal problem occurs prior to treatment and is relieved by it, not visa versa.

To begin with, let's define what root canal treatment is as well as the field of dentistry that specializes in it. Endodontics (“endo” – inside; “dont” – tooth) is the branch of dentistry that addresses problems affecting a tooth's root or nerve. It is dedicated to the diagnosis and treatment of diseases and disorders of the root canals of the teeth. The canals inside the tooth roots contain the living tissues called the dental pulp, which also contain the nerves of the teeth. When the pulp inside a problematic tooth becomes inflamed or infected it responds by becoming painful, and pain is a warning sign of a problem. The nature of the symptoms can define the character of the pain and the problem. They include the following:

  • Sharp, acute pain that is difficult to pinpoint
  • Intense pain that occurs when biting down on the tooth or food
  • Lingering pain after eating either hot or cold foods
  • Dull ache and pressure
  • Tenderness accompanied by swelling in the nearby gums

Each of these different categories of pain signify a different problem, but all are related to root canal issues. Nevertheless, you should contact us today (before your condition worsens) to schedule an appointment. And to learn more about the signs, symptoms, and treatments for a root canal, read the article “I'd Rather Have A Root Canal....”




Questions or Comments?
We encourage you to contact us whenever you have an interest or concern about our services.

(616) 724-1780

(269) 948-8029